RESEARCH

A Foundation

As we all know the proof is in the pudding...
For educational neuroscience that pudding often comes in the form of research.  These studies showcase the empirical and theoretical research that lays the foundation for educational neuroscience.

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TRAUMA & THE BRAIN

 

ISSUE BRIEF: A NATIONAL AND ACROSS-STATE PROFILE ON ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES AMONG U.S. CHILDREN AND POSSIBILITIES TO HEAL AND THRIVE

The Child & Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative (CAHMI)

This issue brief presents the most recent research on the occurrence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). from The Child & Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative detailing the data collected on the occurrence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).

CHILDHOOD DISRUPTED: HOW YOUR BIOGRAPHY BECOMES YOUR BIOLOGY, AND HOW YOU CAN HEAL

Donna Jackson Nakazawa

Science journalist and author, Donna Jackson Nakazawa explores the scientific link between childhood trauma and adult health outcomes in her groundbreaking book, Childhood Disrupted: How Your Biography Becomes Your Biology, and How You Can Heal.  Using true stories and scientific evidence Nakazawa illustrates the heartbreaking reality of childhood adversity and the hopeful future in resiliency research.

THE THREE PILLARS OF TRAUMA INFORMED CARE

Howard Bath

In his article, The Three Pillars of Trauma-Informed Care (2008), clinical psychologist Dr. Howard Bath discusses the importance of safety, connections, and managing emotions when working with children who have experienced trauma.  Beginning with safety, Bath urges caregivers to establish a safe environment for children one that is reliable, consistent, available, and predictable.  Secondly, Bath establishes the need for positive connections with adults and says, “the qualities of the therapeutic relationship itself account for twice as much positive change as the specific therapeutic techniques” (p.20).  To wrap up Bath shares the importance of emotional and impulsive management and recommends co-regulating and active listening among many ways to support self regulation.

CLASSROOM STRATEGIES FOR TRAUMATIZED, OPPOSITIONAL STUDENTS

Mary Ellen Fecser

Oftentimes when we hear the word “trauma” we immediately think of some type of horrific injury or experience, saved only for war and natural disasters but what if that trauma happens everyday, over and over, and not for an adult but for a child?  How do we support the students in our classrooms who walk through the door each day carrying the world’s largest suitcase filled with anxiety, fear, anger, and every other type of emotional baggage imaginable?  How can we as teachers, parents, school staff, caregivers, you name it, how can we help these kiddos get through each day?   Special education teacher and behavior consultant Mary Ellen Fecser offers strategies for the classroom firmly rooted in brain research in her article Classroom Strategies for Traumatized, Oppositional Students.  These practical strategies can be used in a variety of school settings with students PreK through high school and could easily be adapted at home or in the community.  

DISENGAGING FROM CONFLICT CYCLES

Nicholas J. Long

Founder of Life Space Crisis Intervention Institute, Dr. Nicholas J. Long introduces his model, Conflict Cycles, for working with children and adolescents struggling with pain, trauma, and stress.  This brief introduction includes a look at the crucial role adults play in this cycle.

Image by Alex Kondratiev

RELATIONAL DISCIPLINE

 

WHY ADULTS STRIKE BACK: LEARNED BEHAVIOR OR GENETIC CODE?

Nicholas J. Long

Ever have that moment with a kiddo where you hit your breaking point, you have had enough and cannot hold your frustration in any longer?  And then later you think, why did that just happen?  Dr. Nicholas J. Long presents seven reasons why even the most well-tempered adults become counter aggressive with a challenging child from time to time in Why Adults Strike Back: Learned Behavior or Genetic Code? (1995).  According to Dr. Long counteraggression is not only a biological instinct to aggressive behavior but is often fueled by our own mood, experiences, values, and emotions.  It looks like we are really are only human after all!

Image by Louis Reed

EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS

 

BEING PHYSICALLY ACTIVE VERSUS WATCHING PHYSICAL ACTIVITY - EFFECTS ON INHIBITORY CONTROL

Markus W. H. Spitzer & Marco Furtner

In this research study Markus W. H. Spitzer & Marco Furtner use an experimental design to study the effects physical activity has on students’ inhibitory control. In a nutshell they are asking: Does physical activity help students focus and block out distractions?   And their findings?  Keep reading...

COMING SOON...

Check back here to see what research is added!